grover-c-gilmore-web-res

Dean Grover C. Gilmore, PhD

Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Dean in Applied Social Sciences
Professor of Psychology and Social Work


PhD – The Johns Hopkins University
MA – The Johns Hopkins University
AB – Brandeis University
Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

Room 109
Case Western Reserve University
11235 Bellflower Road
Cleveland, Ohio 44106

msassdean@case.edu

About

Grover C. Gilmore is the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Dean in Applied Social Sciences and Professor of Psychology and Social Work at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University. He is the recipient of the John S. Diekhoff Award for Distinguished Graduate Teaching from CWRU. He serves on boards in the community and nation including the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center, Magnolia Clubhouse, the Graduate School of Social Work at the University of Denver, and the University of New England. He is also on the editorial board of Intelligence: A Multidisciplinary Journal.

Read full biosketch.

 Dean Gilmore’s ADCAT Study



Albers, M., Gilmore, G. C., Kaye, J., Murphy, C., Wingfield, A., Bennett, D., Boxer, A., Buchman, A., Cruickshanks, K., Devanand, D. P., Duffy, C. J., Gall, C. M., Gates, G. A, Granholm, A., Hensch, T., Holtzer, R., Hyman, B. T., Lin, F. R., McKee, A. C., Morris, J. C., Petersen, R. C., Silbert, L. C. Struble, R. C., Trojanowski, J. Q., Verghese, J., Wolson, D., Xu, S., Zhang, L. I. (in press). At the interface of sensory s & Dementia.
Barth, R.P., Gilmore, G.C., Flynn, M., Fraser, M.W., & Brekke, J. (in press). The American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare: History and Grand Challenges. Research on Social Work Practice.
Toner, Chelsea K., Reese, Bruce E., Neargarder, Sandy, Riedel, Tatiana, M., Gilmore, Grover C., & Cronin-Golomb, Alice. (2012). Vision-fair neuropsychological assessment in normal aging, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Psychology and Aging, 27, 785-790. doi: 10.1037/a0026368

Seichepine, D.R., Neargarder, S., McCallum, M., Tabor, K., Riedel, T.M., Gilmore, G.C., Cronin-Golomb, A. (2012) Luminance affects age-related defiicits in object detection:  Implications for Computerized Psychological Assessments.  Psychology and Aging, 27, 522-528.  Doi:10.1037/a00225576

Laudate, T. M., Neargarder, S., Dunne, T. E., Sullivan, K. D., Joshi, P., Gilmore, G. C., Riedel, T. M., & Cronin-Golomb, A. (2011). Bingo! Externally-supported performance intervention for deficient visual search in normal aging, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 19, 102–121.

Seichepine, D. R., Neargarder, S., Miller, I. N., Riedel, T. M., Gilmore, G. C., & Cronin-Golomb, A. (2011). Relation of Parkinson’s disease subtypes to visual activities of daily living. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 17, 841–852.

Laudate, T.M., Neargarder, S., Dunne, T.E., Sullivan, K.D., Joshi, P., Gilmore, G.C.,
Tatiana Riedel, T.M., Cronin-Golomb, A. (2011). Bingo! Externally-supported
performance intervention for deficient visual search in normal aging, Parkinson’s
disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, special
issue on “Cognitive and Motivational Mechanisms Compensating for the Limitations
in Performance on Complex Cognitive Tasks across the Adult Life-Span, 19, 102-
121. doi:10.1080/13825585.2011.621930
Publicly available at:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3275685/pdf/nihms336189.pdf

Seichepine, D. R., Neargarder, S., Miller, I. N., Tatiana M. Riedel, Riedel, T. M.,
Gilmore, G. C., & Cronin-Golomb, A. (2011). Relation of Parkinson’s Disease
Subtypes to Visual Activities of Daily Living. Journal of the International
Neuropsychological Society, 17, 841-852. doi:10.1017/S1355617711000853

Invited Presentations

Gilmore, G. C., Levy, E., Rainford, W, & Yegidis, B. Social work week: Three
conferences, One City. National Association of Deans and Directors of Social Work,
Asheville, N.C., April 10, 2014.

Gilmore, G. C. Vision in Alzheimer’s disease. Center for the Study of Neurosciences,
University of New England, Biddeford, April 4, 2011.

Gilmore, G. C. & Lerner, A. Therapeutic effects of cataract removal in Alzheimer’s
disease patients. Grand Rounds in Ophthalmology, University Hospitals Case
Medical Center, Cleveland, March 23, 2011.

Gilmore, G. C. Successful development is about relationships. John A. Hartford
Leadership Academy, Tampa, January 12, 2011.Gilmore, G. C. Overview II: Vision.
National Institute on Aging, Division of Neuroscience Workshop on Sensory and Motor
Dysfunction in Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease. Betheseda, MD, August 9, 2010.

Gilmore, G. C. Peripheral visual dysfunctions in Alzheimer’s Disease. National Institute
on Aging, Division of Neuroscience Workshop on Sensory and Motor Dysfunction
in Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease. Betheseda, MD, August 9, 2010.


 Dean Gilmore in the News:


On Hurricanes Harvey and Irma: A Message from the Dean

Sep 8 2017

Dean Grover “Cleve” Gilmore, PhD sent this message to all Mandel School students, alumni, faculty, and staff on September 8, 2017:

We at the Mandel School have followed with sorrow the news of lives lost and unimaginable damage caused by Hurricane Harvey. Our thoughts have been with our students, alumni, families, friends, and colleagues as they faced the storm’s rage and its aftermath.

Another unprecedented storm is now bearing down on Florida. We are deeply concerned for our students, alumni, friends, families, and colleagues who are in the path of Hurricane Irma. We are also keeping them in our thoughts, and we are keeping the Mandel School at the ready – always here as a community to provide support in the days and weeks ahead as they cope, recover, and overcome.

When I reached out to our Master’s students who are living in Florida, I received inspiring responses of resilience (for several, this is not their first life-threatening storm) and resolve (many are helping others as they take actions to protect themselves, their families, and their clients).

I also wanted to let you know some ways we can help:

  • Online MSSA student Alexis Davis has started a Facebook group with live updates to help her fellow Central Floridians stay connected and get desperately-needed supplies. She reports that many agencies like hers have closed and supplies are running very low. She advises: “The best way for (others) to help is to donate funds to our official disaster fund, Florida Disaster Fund, which the governor just activated. This provides funding for agencies participating in disaster recovery after the storm. Supplies or other items, as we saw with Harvey, only burden volunteers and organizations. For more information: https://www.volunteerflorida.org/govscott-floridadisasterfund-irma/.”
  • I heard from Dean Alan Dettlaff at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, who shared this message: “[During Hurricane Harvey,] some of our [social work] students lost items such as textbooks and laptops that need to be replaced, while others lost cars and homes, and are in need of temporary arrangements for transportation and shelter. Many of you have asked if there are ways for you and your schools to help our students. To facilitate this, our university has established a centralized giving site for those wishing to make a contribution to assist in our students’ recovery efforts.  If you’d like to contribute to this, the site is available here: UH Cougar Emergency Fund.  You can designate your contribution for our social work students by adding “Hurricane Harvey Relief for GCSW Students” once you click through the first page of the giving site. Our students will be able to access these funds for any non-tuition related need resulting from Hurricane Harvey.
  • NASW Texas provides several options to assist with Hurricane Harvey relief.
  • NASW Florida provides these options to assist with Hurricane Irma relief.
  • NPR reported on several large and small nonprofits that also provide assistance.

Thank you.


A Message from Dean Gilmore: August 2017

Aug 16 2017

As we are embarking on a new academic year and welcoming hundreds of new students who will be trained to be effective Change Agents, we are confronted each day with the ills of our nation – from the frightening threat of nuclear war, to the devastating opioid epidemic, to the horrific and heartbreaking events that unfolded last weekend in Charlottesville.

It is more important and urgent than ever to maintain our commitment to being informed, activated, and prepared to assist those in creating social policy and action plans that will defeat these threats to our core values.

The dignity and worth of all people is our driving principle – for the Mandel School and for the professions of social work and nonprofit management. We reaffirm our vow to defend and advocate for all people – regardless of race, ethnicity, nativity, religion, gender, gender identity, ability, or sexual orientation – and to speak out in solidarity with the chorus that champions for social, racial, and economic justice.

Our mission is to build a more just world by advancing leadership in social work and nonprofit education, research, and service. With our passionate new and current students, our alumni network over 8,000 strong, and our faculty and researchers renowned for their work on these most pressing problems, a just world is within our reach.

Dean Grover “Cleve” Gilmore, PhD


On Oppression, Racism, and Chief Wahoo

Apr 11 2017

A statement from Dean Grover “Cleve” Gilmore:

As we engage in professional baseball season in Cleveland, it’s an appropriate time to remind our Mandel School community of the racism and oppression represented by the Cleveland baseball team’s mascot.

As a fan of Cleveland sports, I celebrate our teams’ successes and their positive impact on the community. However, the Chief Wahoo logo is a racist image that demeans and dishonors native cultures – people who are our fellow colleagues, classmates, and clients. I do not wear items with that image, and I ask that everyone consider the full impact on members of our community when choosing attire.

​This semester our Standing Tall for Social Justice project has challenged us each week to consider what we can do to build a better community for all people.  Today I ask you to consider what you can do to support native identifying people.​